• Church Calendar,  Faith

    Lenten Fasting

    Do you fast? Give me proof of it by your works. If you see a poor man, take a pity on him. If you see a friend being honored, do not envy him. Do not let only your mouth fast, but also the eye and the ear and the feet and the hands and all the members of our bodies. Let the hands fast, by being free of avarice. Let the feet fast, by ceasing to run after sin. Let the eyes fast, by disciplining them not to glare that which is sinful. Let the ear fast, by not listening to evil talk and gossip. Let the mouth fast from…

  • Church Calendar

    God With Us [Advent, Christmastide, and Epiphany]

    Tim and I have appreciated the deep liturgy of many church traditions for some time. Through many influences and inspirations, we have slowly incorporated as much of the church calendar into our lives as possible. Because as W. David O. Taylor said, “If the church doesn’t tell us what time it is, the surrounding culture surely will, and we usually end up the worse for it.” Since joining the Anglican Communion, we’ve dived even deeper. As I’ve explored many resources to understand the “why” behind each tradition and activity, I’ve compiled many ideas on this Pinterest board, The Liturgical Year. Here is a bit of what we’re attempting to do…

  • Church Calendar,  Faith

    And He Will Be Called

    Isaiah 9:6 “And he will be called .. Mighty God.” “Mighty God is the name of this child.  The child in the manager is none other than God himself. Nothing greater can be said: God became a child. Here he is, poor like us, miserable and helpless like us, a person of flesh and blood like us, our brother. And yet he is God: he is might. Where is the divinity, where is the might of the child? In the divine love in which he became like us. His poverty in the manager is his might. In the might of love he overcomes the chasm between God and humankind, he…

  • Church Calendar,  Ethiopia,  Extensions,  Faith,  Mozambique

    Lenten Reflections: Isaiah 58

    “Is this the kind of fast I have chosen, only a day for a man to humble himself? Is it only for bowing one’s head like a reed and for lying on sackcloth and ashes? Is that what you call a fast, a day acceptable to the Lord? Is not this the kind of fasting I have chosen: to loose the chains of injustice and untie the cords of the yoke, to set the oppressed free and break every yoke?”  During this Lenten time of self-examination, we pause to consider our brokenness and great need—our vulnerability and inability to do enough fasting or law-keeping to earn even an ounce of righteousness. One of my first encounters with…